Curious what the Most Expensive Keywords in Google’s Adwords Are?

1 Comment

WordStream summarized their findings in their infographic of the ‘most expensive keywords. The infographic clearly depicts the top 20 key words categories that are minting Google the money, owing to the increased search volume and CTC, are :

 

 

 

Descending From Highest to Lowest
  • “Insurance” (“buy car insurance online” and “auto insurance price quotes”)
  • Loans (“consolidate graduate student loans” and “cheapest homeowner loans”)
  • Mortgage (“refinanced second mortgages” and “remortgage with bad credit”)
  • Attorney (“personal injury attorney” and “dui defense attorney”)
  • Credit  (“home equity line of credit” and “bad credit home buyer”)
  • Lawyer (“personal injury lawyer,” “criminal defense lawyer)
  • Donate (“car donation centers,” “donating a used car”)
  • Degree (“criminal justice degrees online,” “psychology bachelors degree online”)
  • Hosting (“hosting ms exchange,” “managed web hosting solution”)
  • Claim (“personal injury claim,” “accident claims no win no fee”
  • Conference Call (“best conference call service,” “conference calls toll free”)
  • Trading (“cheap online trading,” “stock trades online”)
  • Software (“crm software programs,” “help desk software cheap”)
  • Recovery (“raid server data recovery,” “hard drive recovery laptop”)
  • Transfer (“zero apr balance transfer,” “credit card balance transfer zero interest”)
  • Gas/Electricity (“business electricity price comparison,” “switch gas and electricity suppliers”)
  • Classes (“criminal justice online classes,” “online classes business administration”)
  • Rehab (“alcohol rehab centers,” “crack rehab centers”)
  • Treatment (“mesothelioma treatment options,” “drug treatment centers”)
  • Cord Blood (“cordblood bank,” “store umbilical cord blood”)

 

Implications:
Google AdWords works by bidding for maximizing profits, where the advertisers take part in an auction of keywords for top ad placement. As top ad placement could lead to possible extra clicks. The minimum bid one can make is 5 cents. And as Larry Kim points out, “Google can make up to $50 per click. Despite a diversified product portfolio, advertising on Google sites accounts for the majority of its billions in annual revenue.”

A statement made by Google’s Chief Economist back in September 2009 can perhaps prove as a justification on Google’s part for warning its users about the cost implications, “Your incremental cost per click is how much extra you are paying, on average, for the extra clicks you are getting from your higher bid. When your value per click is higher than your incremental cost per click it makes sense to increase your bid. On the other hand, if your value per click is lower than your incremental cost per click, you probably want to decrease your bid.” I guess, you can’t blame Google solely for the revenue they generate as result of the price we end up paying. If you’ve evaluated bidding highly and $50 per click is going to profit you then its your decision. Google starts the bid at an affordable 5 cent, its your competitors you need to blame for hiking the bid price and not Google.

In addition to that, whilst these industries are ending up paying high sum for their CTC’s an important point to note is, these industries have a dedicated customer traffic inflow. So, these businesses in principle do not mind paying such high value sums. So, who’s to be blamed? Certainly, not Google.
With the increase in the competition, will mean added fight over key words. So, the future looks good for Google as key words will get increasingly more expensive.

Source: http://www.wordstream.com/blog/ws/2011/07/18/most-expensive-google-adwords-keywords

About us and this blog

We are a digital marketing company with a focus on helping our customers achieve great results across several key areas.

Request a free quote

We offer professional SEO services that help websites increase their organic search score drastically in order to compete for the highest rankings even when it comes to highly competitive keywords.

Subscribe to our newsletter!

Fields marked with an * are required

More from our blog

See all posts